Thursday, January 28, 2010

African American / Black History Month: Activities and Current Events in the Montessori Classroom

NAMC montessori activities black history month picking cotton
February is African American History Month (also known as Black History Month) in the US, Canada and Jamaica. In Britain, Black (or Afrikan) History Month is marked in October. The current earthquake turmoil in Haiti provides the opportunity to apply a more specific perspective to your Montessori classroom study of African American History month. Employing a cross-curriculum approach covering the geography, history and culture of Haiti, your annual study of African American History Month can tie into current events and help reinforce a global and historical consciousness, empathy and even peace activities.

The majority of Haitians are of African descent. Your Montessori students may enjoy comparing and tracing the timelines and paths of Africans as they came to Haiti and the United States. Encourage your students to consider how, when and why Africans came to Haiti and the United States. What happened once they arrived?

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Thursday, January 28, 2010.

Tuesday, January 26, 2010

2010 Olympic Games Montessori Classroom Activity Guide

The most important thing in the Olympic Games is not to win, but to take part, just as the most important thing in life is not the triumph, but the struggle. The essential thing is not to have conquered, but to have fought well. ~ Bishop Ethelbert Talbot, 1908 Olympic Games

NAMC montessori 2010 olympic games classroom activity guide skier
These words, first spoken by Bishop Ethelbert Talbot during a speech given to Olympic athletes at the 1908 Olympic Games, became the creed for the modern Olympics. Meant to spur athletes to live up to the Olympic motto of “Citius, Altius, Fortius” (Faster, Higher, Stronger), men and women around the world train their bodies, minds and spirits to compete in hopes of becoming an Olympic athlete.

Montessori classrooms and material support and encourage learning. Montessori believed that education must be authentic and appeal to children. By bringing the Olympics into your classroom, you are providing appealing, real-life examples which will stimulate the imagination and learning of your students.

Here are just some ideas on how to incorporate the Olympic theme into your Montessori environment.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, January 26, 2010.

Friday, January 22, 2010

Haiti Activities and Resources: A Cultural Study in the Montessori Classroom

NAMC montessori activities and resources cultural study Haiti children with globe
Children are human beings to whom respect is due, superior to us by reason of their innocence. ~ Maria Montessori, Dr. Montessori’s Own Handbook

Natural disasters can be terrifying to people of all ages. Last week’s devastating earthquake in Haiti and the subsequent aftershocks are no exception. It seems as if the whole world is focused right now on the natural disaster and human tragedy that has befallen Haiti in recent years. It is impossible to turn on the TV, radio, or internet or pick up any form of print media without seeing pictures or hearing about the current Haitian conditions. With the latest study showing that the average American child uses electronic media almost 8 hours per day (HealthDay News, January 20, 2010), it is imperative that the adults around them are aware of and limit the amount and type of information being presented to them.

Currently there is an international outpouring of solidarity, compassion, and aid in response to the devastation in Haiti. People from around the world are reaching out to a country many may not even be able to place on a map, to people who are complete strangers. Let us take this time to explore and learn more about the country and people of Haiti through activities and resources that span the full Montessori curriculum.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, January 22, 2010.

Thursday, January 21, 2010

History of the Olympics - From Greece to the 2010 Olympic Games in the Montessori Classroom

NAMC montessori classroom history of the olympics canada flag
Learning about the Olympics is a fun way to bring cultural and physical geography, history, literature, math, health, physical education, and even physics into your Montessori environment.

The 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games begin February 12 and March 12, respectively. Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, is the 18th city to host the Winter Olympics and the third Canadian city to host the Olympic Games. The first Canadian Olympics was held in Montreal, Quebec during the summer of 1976, and the 1988 Winter Olympics were held in Calgary, Alberta. The 2010 Olympic Games will last for 16 days, with opening ceremonies commencing on February 12 and ending with the closing ceremony on February 28. The Paralympic Games begin March 12 and close on March 21, 2010.

At the Olympic Games, approximately 2,500 athletes from over 80 countries will compete in 15 different sports and over 86 separate medal events.

Over 1,300 athletes and officials from more than 40 countries will take part in five sports (alpine and cross-country skiing, ice sledge hockey, wheelchair curling and biathlon) during the 10-day 2010 Paralympic Winter Games.

To truly understand about the modern Olympics, it is important to study the beginnings of the Olympics which started in Greece in the year 776 BCE.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Thursday, January 21, 2010.

Thursday, January 14, 2010

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day - Activities and Resources for the Montessori Classroom

… on the satisfaction of (the child’s) more spiritual needs the progress of humanity depends – the creation indeed of a stronger and better humanity. ~ Maria Montessori, To Educate the Human Potential

NAMC montessori peace education martin luther king day activities
Montessori education centers on this one very important belief. In developing her philosophy and method, Dr. Montessori drew on her experience and education in science, medicine, philosophy, pedagogy, anthropology, and by no small measure, in life. She lived in the time and on the continent of the two great wars of the 20th century. Perhaps this is, in part, why she so strongly advocated that education is the key to peace.

As Montessori educators and parents, we embrace Montessori peace education, and look for ways to include it in the daily life of the Montessori students and children in our care. Peace education crosses all disciplines, integrating lessons in history, language, geography, and practical life.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Thursday, January 14, 2010.

Friday, January 8, 2010

NAMC Mastery Checklists for the Montessori Elementary Classroom

NAMC mastery checklist montessori elementary classroom teacher writing reportIn an effort to assist our graduates and schools with their observation and record-keeping efforts, NAMC has just recently completed Mastery Checklists for our Montessori elementary programs. These checklists complement the scope of activities contained in the current edition NAMC curriculum manuals for each program:
  • Lower Elementary (6–9 years)
  • Upper Elementary (9–12 years)
In the Montessori environment, organized record-keeping helps teachers run a program efficiently, meet government reporting requirements, and provide parents with feedback about their children. But most importantly, record-keeping helps teachers facilitate the student’s learning.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, January 8, 2010.

Wednesday, January 6, 2010

Montessori Planes of Development: Upper Elementary Characteristics in the Second Plane

…We are confronted with a considerable development of consciousness that has already taken place, but now that consciousness is thrown outwards with a special direction, intelligence being extroverted, and there is an unusual demand on the part of the child to know the reasons of things. Knowledge can be best given where there is eagerness to learn, so this is the period when the seed of everything can be sown, the child’s mind being like a fertile field, ready to receive what will germinate into culture. ~ Maria Montessori, To Educate the Human Potential
NAMC montessori planes of development upper elementary characteristics second plane teacher and students read map
Between the ages of 9-12, children use imagination and move from concrete representation to abstract thinking as they seek to bring order to the various disconnected facts and ideas they encounter in the world. They are able to think hypothetically. Montessori believed it is also a time of great moral development. No longer merely concerned with right and wrong, good and bad, the Montessori upper elementary student now seeks to understand the motivation behind behavior. When confronted with moral issues, the upper elementary student seeks to imagine and develop possible solutions.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Wednesday, January 6, 2010.
Find What Interests You Easily!

Are you interested in reading back through NAMC's blog articles from years gone by? Are you looking for more information on a specific topic?

Use the menu below to select the year and then the month to narrow down the time frame the articles you are interested in were posted. You can also browse our entire list of categories below; by clicking on one, you will see every article posted under that topic since 2007.

Still having trouble finding what you're looking for? Try our search box (located in the side bar of every page) to search all posts on our site for your keyword. If you require further information, or have comments or concerns, feel free to contact us.

NAMC Montessori Teacher Training Blog Archive

Post Category Labels

We'd love to hear from you!

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community.

NAMC is always looking for feedback and dialogue with our students and other Montessorians. We invite you to contact us if you may have any questions or comments in regards to our blog or articles we have posted here at our Montessori Teacher Training page.

Please note:If you want to learn more about NAMC, are interested in our programs, or are a student, please contact us through the main NAMC site to ensure a timely response from one of our advisors, tutors, or education specialists.

Fill out my online form.