Friday, May 29, 2009

Show Your Appreciation with a Children’s Day - Books and Activities for the Montessori Classroom

NAMC montessori teacher children's day activities appreciation child high five
Many of us may be starting our summer vacations and though you may not see your Montessori students every day, the summer is a perfect time to continue to build relationships with them. What a lovely time for your students to get a nice note from you in the mail. It’s an opportunity to show your students you appreciate them, know them, and value their place in your life. These actions can help to build the mutual respect that is essential in the Montessori classroom.

Honoring the value of children worldwide is a concept introduced by the United Nations some fifty years ago. Around the world, many countries honor a National Child’s Day, sometimes also known as Universal Child’s Day. The date can vary, from country to country; some celebrate in May, June, or November. Think of this day in your country as a catalyst for cultural activities and lessons focused on the value, rights and welfare of children around the world.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, May 29, 2009.

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Montessori Cultural Activity: Introducing Democratic Elections in the Montessori Classroom

NAMC montessori culture activity introducing democratic elections circle time
Written by NAMC blog contest finalist, Namita Jain.

We are pleased to share this guest submission, the third of three finalists in the NAMC blog contest. We thank Namita for her participation, and hope you enjoy this activity created for the Montessori Preschool/Kindergarten classroom, and adaptable to the Montessori elementary classroom.

Early childhood is the time of the “absorbent mind,” the age when a child literally starts taking impressions from the environment. It is the time to carefully introduce experiences, not with lessons or lectures, but experientially and sensorially, with practical activities.

It is election time in India. By use of a carefully-designed Montessori activity, the democratic election process is introduced in the Montessori curriculum.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Wednesday, May 27, 2009.

Monday, May 25, 2009

Montessori at Home - How to Create a Prepared Environment

NAMC montessori how to create home prepared environment shelves science area
More and more, I meet and speak with parents who embrace the Montessori method, and wish to implement the Montessori philosophy and methodology in their homes. To do so successfully, it is important to have a well-prepared environment. Here are some helpful guidelines to consider when creating the Montessori environment at home.

Everyone’s home is unique, and every Montessori prepared environment in the home will reflect those nuances. Although the home Montessori environment will have its own “flavor”, all Montessori prepared environments have the following features in common:

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Monday, May 25, 2009.

Thursday, May 21, 2009

Montessori Zoology Activity for the Early Childhood Classroom: Where the Wild Things Are

NAMC Montessori classroom zoology activity where the wild things are deer
Written by NAMC blog contest finalist, Rachael Partain.

We are pleased to share this guest submission, the second of three finalists in the NAMC blog contest. We thank Rachael for her participation, and hope you enjoy this activity created for the Montessori Preschool/Kindergarten classroom.

As a pre-service Montessori teacher, I have practiced in a variety of non-Montessori schools, most recently with a local Head Start Program. It is often a challenge to incorporate the Montessori method while still meeting my lesson planning requirements, and the appropriate state standards.

The activity below combines a Montessori lesson plan that I designed with the components required by public education institutes. It touches on a variety of cross-curricular standards. I hope you enjoy this lesson and I hope that it gives you ideas for meeting your state or national standards while allowing you to apply your knowledge of the Montessori method.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Thursday, May 21, 2009.

Tuesday, May 19, 2009

US Memorial Day Activities and Reading for the Montessori Classroom

NAMC montessori peace education activities memorial day statue
Many Montessori schools conclude the academic year before Memorial Day, which is officially held annually on the last Monday of May. Despite this, Montessori teachers can expose Montessori students to the history and observances of Memorial Day before they break for the summer. By doing so, the students can better appreciate the significance and impact of wars throughout American history.

The true beginnings of Memorial Day are difficult to trace. Many small towns were doing their own unique observation before officially declared by General John Logan on May 5, 1868. The day was first observed on May 30, 1868 by the laying of flowers on the graves of Confederate and Union soldiers in Arlington National Cemetery. In 1873, New York officially recognized Memorial Day and by 1890, all of the northern states had followed suit. The southern states honored their dead on separate days until after WWI. At that time the holiday changed from a day to honor those who died in the Civil War to a day to honor all Americans who died in any war. Now Memorial Day is celebrated on the last Monday in May. In 1915, Moina Michael began the tradition of wearing red poppies to honor those who died. The VFW still continues this effort. In 1971, Congress passed a bill establishing the last Monday in May as a federal holiday, therefore creating a three-day weekend. Read on for a selection of activities and reading material suitable for studying Memorial Day in your Montessori classroom.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, May 19, 2009.

Thursday, May 14, 2009

Buddha Day / Wesak Culture Curriculum Activities in the Montessori Classroom

NAMC Montessori classroom culture curriculum activities buddha day wesak young buddhist
Every year I share with my Montessori students the book, A Faith Like Mine, by Laura Buller. They truly enjoy the book and it leads to many wonderful discussions. The students like to compare the different religions and often select a religion or holiday to research. After completing their research, they share what they learned with their classmates.

Wesak is the most important day in the Buddhist calendar and is celebrated in May. Also known as Vesak or Buddha Day, Wesak celebrates the birthday, enlightenment and death of Buddha. It is held the day of the first full moon in May. On this day, Buddhists celebrate Buddha’s teachings and remember his insights about death, karma, rebirth, and suffering. Wesak is a celebration of joy and color. Buddhists clean and decorate their homes and begin to celebrate before dawn. Water is poured over Buddha statues and offerings are made to Buddhist monks and temples. Temples offer vegetarian food, lectures and candlelit processions. Learn more about this special holiday, and share these interesting activity ideas with your Montessori students.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Thursday, May 14, 2009.

Tuesday, May 12, 2009

Play and Work in Montessori Education

NAMC montessori education work and play boys playing checkers
Written by NAMC blog contest finalist, Dr. David Elkind, PhD

We are pleased to share this guest submission, the first of three finalists in the NAMC blog contest. We thank Dr. Elkind for his participation, and hope you enjoy this thoughtful article on early childhood education.

“Play is the Child’s Work” is perhaps Maria Montessori’s best-known aphorism. Unfortunately, this phrase is often misinterpreted to suggest that work and play are identical and that children should be working, not playing. But that is really not what Dr. Montessori had in mind. Montessori wrote, for example, that children might well use their imagination to think about a distant country like America, rather than a fairy tale land. In so doing she recognized that imagination or play was not the same as work. Montessori also appreciated that learning is most effective when play and work are united in a single activity. To appreciate this insight, we need to be clear about the difference between play and work.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, May 12, 2009.

Thursday, May 7, 2009

The Thought Filled Montessori Classroom - Thinking Together, Learning to Think, and Thinking to Learn

It is true that we cannot make a genius. We can only give to teach child the chance to fulfill his potential possibilities. (Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, 1995)
NAMC thought filled montessori classroom thinking girl gardening
Now, more than ever, citizens of the 21st century need to be not only skilled at what they do, but they need to be informed and capable of great thought. Like the great thinkers of the Enlightenment, they need to creatively embrace the quest for truth. They must be capable of great love and compassion for the cosmic interdependence of life on Earth. Gone are the days of rote learning and memorization. Instead, children must be given real life scenarios in which to apply their learning in new situations.

As Montessori teachers, we know the importance of real, applied learning. We know the value of teaching children to think for themselves, not relying on adults for all the answers. We have seen the art of collaboration at work in our multi-age classrooms. We know firsthand that the child who thinks for him/herself is not afraid to take risks and try new things to solve complex problems. Art Costa (Professor Emeritus, California State University, Sacramento) calls this a “Thought Filled Curriculum”.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Thursday, May 7, 2009.

Tuesday, May 5, 2009

Mother’s Day Activities in the Montessori Classroom

NAMC montessori classroom mother's day activities child gives mom cardI have found that my Montessori students, no matter what age, are always eager to show their mothers how much they are loved. Recognizing Mother’s Day in your Montessori classroom is the perfect opportunity to incorporate history, art and character development. It’s also an opportunity to build relationships with parents by inviting mothers to a special event in the classroom.

Mother’s Day, a day to celebrate and honor mothers, is observed on the second Sunday in May in North America. Many other countries also celebrate Mother’s Day at other times of the year. Ancient Greeks honored Rhea, the mother of many gods, at a spring festival. Starting in the 1600s, Christians in the United Kingdom honored Mary, the mother of Jesus, on the fourth Sunday of Lent. This day, called Mothering Sunday, was also a time to attend Mass at one’s regional “Mother Church.”

Families celebrate Mother’s Day by allowing their mother to relax while the rest of the family makes dinner and takes care of other household tasks. Mothers are often surprised with breakfast in bed and handmade cards and gifts from their children. Grandmothers are also honored by their children and grandchildren on Mother’s Day.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, May 5, 2009.
Find What Interests You Easily!

Are you interested in reading back through NAMC's blog articles from years gone by? Are you looking for more information on a specific topic?

Use the menu below to select the year and then the month to narrow down the time frame the articles you are interested in were posted. You can also browse our entire list of categories below; by clicking on one, you will see every article posted under that topic since 2007.

Still having trouble finding what you're looking for? Try our search box (located in the side bar of every page) to search all posts on our site for your keyword. If you require further information, or have comments or concerns, feel free to contact us.

NAMC Montessori Teacher Training Blog Archive

Post Category Labels

We'd love to hear from you!

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community.

NAMC is always looking for feedback and dialogue with our students and other Montessorians. We invite you to contact us if you may have any questions or comments in regards to our blog or articles we have posted here at our Montessori Teacher Training page.

Please note:If you want to learn more about NAMC, are interested in our programs, or are a student, please contact us through the main NAMC site to ensure a timely response from one of our advisors, tutors, or education specialists.

Fill out my online form.