Tuesday, January 29, 2008

Montessori Peace Education: Mohandas Gandhi History and Activity

NAMC Montessori Peace Education: Mohandas Gandhi History and Activity Statue
For my series on peacemakers, I've chosen to look at the life of Mohandas Gandhi, a name often synonymous with the term “peacemaker”. Gandhi was born in 1869, and was the son of the prime minister of Porbandar, a coastal city in the Indian state of Gujaret. Gandhi is best known for leading India to independence from British rule by using mass non-violent civil disobedience.

Gandhi encountered racism, prejudice and discrimination against Indians in both South Africa and in India. It was in South Africa where Gandhi had his first success in uniting the Indian people against those who discriminated against them. He called upon and challenged his fellow Indians to defy authority through non-violent protest rather than by using violence.

Read on for inspiring information, as well as a class discussion topic and classroom activity idea.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, January 29, 2008.

Thursday, January 17, 2008

Montessori Peace Education: Martin Luther King Jr. History and Activity

NAMC montessori peace education peacemakers martin luther king student activity

“I have a dream today . . . that one day . . . little black boys and little black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and little white girls as sisters and brothers. . . “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.” Martin Luther King Jr., August 28, 1963

In the first of my series on Peacemakers, I have chosen to examine the life of Martin Luther King Jr. and the impact that he had on equal rights in the United States. Born the son of a Black Baptist minister, Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929-1968) believed, like Mohandas “Mahatma” Gandhi, that the power of love was greater than the power of hate. His beliefs led to his own non-violent crusade against racial segregation in America.

Read on for inspiring information, as well as a class discussion topic and classroom activity idea.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Thursday, January 17, 2008.

Montessori Peace Education: Peacemakers of the World

namc montessori peace education children dancing
Throughout time, the word “peacemaker” has been used to describe someone who creates peace by ending conflict. Though, for as long as humans have been on the earth, warfare has been part of our lives. In fact, up until the mid-19th century, warfare was considered by many to be a noble activity.

Henri Dunant challenged this belief by creating the Red Cross in 1863. Winner of the first Nobel Prize (1901) and one of the founders of the modern peace movement, most of the peace organizations today owe their origins to him. As children become more self-aware, they begin to develop sensitivity and awareness for people of other cultures and the global environment.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on .

Sunday, January 13, 2008

Promoting Parent Involvement in Your Montessori Community

Promoting Parent Involvement NAMC montessori classroom community volcano
Developing and building a strong sense of community within your Montessori school is essential to the success of the school. This can be accomplished by having school events that include teachers, students and parents. For every Montessori teacher there are 20-40 parents. In my classroom alone, I have over 60 parents! As over 55% of families found out about their current Montessori school from a friend, happy and knowledgeable parents not only keep their children in the school, but become advocates for future families.

Here are some ideas of school activities and events:

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Sunday, January 13, 2008.

The Importance of Educating the Montessori Parent

Importance of Educating the NAMC Montessori Parent and montessori teacher
In 2007, The American Montessori Society researched how families found out about their Montessori School.
  • 55% - Heard about it from a friend
  • 18% - Found out about it at a school fair or open house
  • 18% - Drove by and saw the school sign
  • 9% - Researched private elementary schools in their geographic area 

AMS also gathered statistics as to what was most helpful when making the decision to enroll their children in a Montessori school. The overwhelming majority stated that the most useful information was touring the school and speaking with the principal, teachers and parents.

When asked what information was missing or would have been useful in their decision-making, the majority of parents stated that a comparative description of Montessori and traditional education would have been very useful.

Educating parents, both current and future, about Montessori education is a win-win situation. Parents with children already enrolled in your school will be your biggest advocates. They will share and talk to other families about their positive experience with Montessori education. Parent education comes in many forms. Here are some ideas for effective parent education sessions:

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on .

Choosing the Right Montessori School as a Teacher

Choosing Right NAMC Montessori School as a Teacher and student
When searching for the right Montessori school in which to teach, many of the same considerations should be taken as if you were a parent searching for the right school for your child.

Before you apply to a school, do as much research as you can. Many schools have websites where you can get a sense of their mission statement, philosophy, and environment. Sometimes by simply reading through a school’s website, you will get an idea of whether or not the school may be a good fit for you.

When you are called for an interview, have a set of prepared questions to take in with you. Try to schedule at least half of a day for observation if the administration doesn’t require it during their hiring process. During the interview and observation, keep these questions in mind:

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on .

Tuesday, January 8, 2008

Being a Montessori Parent: A Family Decision

NAMC montessori parent a family decision choose montessori mother daughter gardening
So, you've decided to research Montessori education as a possibility for your child. You've attended parent information sessions, open houses, met with the director of admissions, had a tour of the Montessori school, observed in a Montessori classroom, spoken with other parents. It’s looking pretty favorable, but there’s one more step. Before deciding if Montessori is right for your family, you must ask yourself the following questions.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, January 8, 2008.

Friday, January 4, 2008

A Parent's Guide to Observing in a Montessori Classroom

parent's guide to observing NAMC montessori classroom children eating snack
In a previous blog, A Parent's Guide to Choosing the Right Montessori School, I discussed what to look for in a Montessori school. For this article, I’d like to talk about the importance of and the best way to observe in a Montessori Classroom.

Spending time observing in a Montessori classroom provides you with an excellent and unparalleled opportunity to see what life is like inside a Montessori school and classroom. Whether this is your first exposure to the Montessori experience or you are investigating a new school, your experience in the classroom will give you an insight as to what your child will experience as a Montessori student.

In order to have the best possible observation, here are a few tips for observing and interpreting what you see in Montessori classrooms.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, January 4, 2008.

Wednesday, January 2, 2008

A Parent's Guide to Choosing the Right Montessori School

NAMC montessori teacher and student choosing the right montessori school parent's guide Early registration and planning ahead is not unique to my Montessori school. It happens every year at every Montessori school around the world. Parents want the best education for their children and will do just about everything possible to obtain it for them.

You are fortunate if you live in an area that has several Montessori schools from which to choose. However, do not assume that all Montessori schools are created equal. The name “Montessori” refers to the method and philosophy of education adopted by the school. It is not a franchise or patented, and although most schools strive to remain true to the teachings of Dr. Montessori, there are variations of Montessori schools.

So, how do you know if you’ve found the right Montessori school for your child?

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Wednesday, January 2, 2008.
Find What Interests You Easily!

Are you interested in reading back through NAMC's blog articles from years gone by? Are you looking for more information on a specific topic?

Use the menu below to select the year and then the month to narrow down the time frame the articles you are interested in were posted. You can also browse our entire list of categories below; by clicking on one, you will see every article posted under that topic since 2007.

Still having trouble finding what you're looking for? Try our search box (located in the side bar of every page) to search all posts on our site for your keyword. If you require further information, or have comments or concerns, feel free to contact us.

NAMC Montessori Teacher Training Blog Archive

Post Category Labels

We'd love to hear from you!

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community.

NAMC is always looking for feedback and dialogue with our students and other Montessorians. We invite you to contact us if you may have any questions or comments in regards to our blog or articles we have posted here at our Montessori Teacher Training page.

Please note:If you want to learn more about NAMC, are interested in our programs, or are a student, please contact us through the main NAMC site to ensure a timely response from one of our advisors, tutors, or education specialists.

Fill out my online form.