Showing posts with label Montessori Philosophy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Montessori Philosophy. Show all posts

Thursday, July 17, 2014

The Absorbent Mind Chapter 17: Further Elaboration: Part 3: The Mathematical Mind

“The results we obtain with our little ones contrast oddly with the fact that mathematics is so often held to be a scourge rather than pleasure in school programs. Most people have developed ‘mental barriers’ against it. Yet all is easy if only its roots can be implanted in the absorbent mind.”Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. 186.



As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Thursday, July 17, 2014.

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

The Absorbent Mind Chapter 17: Acquisition of Culture Part 2: Imagination


“Is the child’s mental horizon limited to what he sees? No. He has a type of mind that goes beyond the concrete. He has the great power of imagination.” — Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. 175–176



As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Wednesday, July 9, 2014.

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Understanding the Child’s Sense of Order in the Montessori Environment

“It seems to him, at this stage, a particularly vital matter that everything in his environment should be kept in its accustomed place; and that the actions of the day should be carried out in their accustomed routine.” – E.M. Standing, Maria Montessori: Her Life and Work, p. 123





As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Wednesday, June 11, 2014.

Friday, April 11, 2014

Montessori: A Heuristic Approach to Learning

“When the child is given freedom to move about in a world of objects, he is naturally inclined to perform the tasks necessary for his development entirely on his own.” — Maria Montessori, Education and Peace


There has been some buzz lately about the term heuristic. When I went online to check current definitions, I read on Merriam-Webster.com that heuristic is “currently in the top 1% of lookups and is the 154th most popular word on Merriam-Webster.com.” In fact, the site goes on to note that there has been a significant increase in people looking up the word “heuristic” in the last seven days. (Merriam-Webster.com) So, what does “heuristic” mean and what does it have to do with Montessori?

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, April 11, 2014.

Friday, April 4, 2014

Adjusting Activities for Montessori - The Internet as a Resource for Educators

When I began my Montessori career, finding Montessori ideas and lessons on the Internet was challenging to say the least. My colleagues and I frequently bemoaned the lack of resources and photos. Today, there are blogs, such as NAMC’s Montessori blog, YouTube videos, and social media sites, like Pinterest, where Montessori educators and parents collectively post their ideas, lessons, and advice.

namc adjusting internet activities for montessori teacher and girl

This wealth of information can be helpful, but it is important to remember some basic Montessori principals as you search the Internet for Montessori work.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, April 4, 2014.

Friday, March 28, 2014

Conscious Interaction with Infants - Supporting Childhood Development Around the World

"When you hold an infant, hold him not just with your body, but with your mind and heart." – Magda Gerber

NAMC Montessori interaction infants childhood development baby boy portrait

In our continuing blog series studying the works of Montessori, we have looked at the first nine chapters of The Absorbent Mind. All over the world, educators and caregivers find common ground in many of Montessori’s ideas– especially so when it comes to the care of infants. Psychologist Laura Berk, like Montessori, states that “knowledge of the world is first gathered through the senses.” Berk notes the physical changes in heart rate and respiration in infants when there is a change in their environment – someone new arrives, there are new pictures on the wall, or mother starts wearing new cologne. (Berk, 2006)

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, March 28, 2014.

Friday, March 14, 2014

Montessori’s Use of the Term ‘Psychic’ - Developing Personalities in Early Childhood

“Special care should be shown for the psychic life of the newborn child. If it already has such a life at birth, how much greater will this be as it grows older? If we understand by ‘education’ a child’s psychic rather than its intellectual development, we may truly say, as it is said today, that a child’s education should begin at birth.” — Maria Montessori, The Secret of Childhood, p. 29.

NAMC montessori psychic developing personality early childhood happy infant

Word meaning and usage evolve over time. The word “psychic,” for example, today conjures up fortune tellers and people who commune with the dead. It can have a negative connotation that leaves one skeptical of these professed mental powers.

Dr. Montessori used the word “psychic” in a somewhat different context, referring to the psyche, or one’s mind and soul, and the development of one’s personality.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, March 14, 2014.

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

The Absorbent Mind, Chapter 5: The Miracle of Creation - Studying the Works of Montessori

“Thinkers in every age have been struck by the astonishing fact that a being which at first does not exist, should end by becoming a man or a woman, able even to think and to have ideas of its own.” — Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. 34.

namc montessori studying absorbent mind chapter 5 baby holding finger

When I first read Chapter 5 of The Absorbent Mind, The Miracle of Creation, I found myself thinking of the scientific advances that have happened since Montessori’s time.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, February 25, 2014.

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

The Absorbent Mind, Chapter 4: The New Path - Studying the Works of Montessori

“…no one can do for the child the work he has to do to build the man he is making.” — Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. 30.

NAMC Montessori the absorbent mind chapter 4 studying the works girl on slide

If you have ever watched a young child as her birthday approaches, you know that this is a time full of excitement and expectation. My niece, who recently turned 5, started counting down the days to her birthday several months before the big day. And who would not be excited to know they were growing bigger, stronger, and smarter? It is a BIG deal. It is as if with each birthday, children anticipate their newer, better self.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, February 18, 2014.

Friday, February 7, 2014

The Absorbent Mind, Chapter 3: The Periods of Growth - Studying the Works of Montessori

“It may be said that we acquire knowledge by using our minds; but the child absorbs knowledge directly into his psychic life. Simply by continuing to live, the child learns to speak his native tongue. A kind of mental chemistry goes on within him…Impressions do not merely enter his mind; they form it. They incarnate themselves in him. The child creates his own ‘mental muscles,’ using for this what he finds in the world about him. We have named this type of mentality, The Absorbent Mind.” — Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. 26.

namc montessori studying the works absorbent mind chapter 3 baby on grass

With this passage, Dr. Montessori introduces her term absorbent mind, the focus of her book. Children in the first plane of development, from age 0–6, absorb everything that is in their environment. Chapter 3, The Periods of Growth, discusses how the absorbent mind differs from the mind at any other stage of development.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, February 7, 2014.

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

The Absorbent Mind, Chapter 2: Education for Life - Studying the Works of Montessori

NAMC studying the works of montessori absorbent mind education for life

“In states that make it a priority to educate our youngest children…studies show students grow up more likely to read and do math at grade level, graduate high school, hold a job, form more stable families of their own. We know this works. So let’s do what works and make sure none of our children start the race of life already behind.” ~ President Barack Obama, State of the Union, February 12, 2013.

This is the second installment of our series, Studying the Works of Montessori, focusing on Chapter 2 of the Absorbent Mind.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, February 4, 2014.

Friday, January 31, 2014

The Freedom To Play: Skills and Development on the Montessori Playground

“All too often children’s spontaneous active play has been transformed into passive audience participation.” — David Elkind, The Power of Play, pg. xii

namc montessori freedom to play skills and development girl climbing rope net

Recess duty was a new experience for me when I became a Montessori teacher, and my first day on the playground was an eye opener. I thought that it would not be that hard to let the children play and get rid of their excess energy. However, the school I was at took a different view of what was considered appropriate play. I was informed that the children were not allowed to play tag or run on the black top because they might fall and get hurt; they could not roll down the hill as they would get dirty; and they were not allowed to play football because it was a contact sport. There was no climbing equipment because of concerns that the children might fall off. The children were not even allowed to shout and play loudly in case they disturbed the other classes. Once winter came and snow covered the playground, the children were not allowed to play in the field and were expected instead to walk around the pre-shoveled area on the blacktop. The children were not happy with these restrictions. They were bored and often took out their frustration on each other. It became a frequent topic at our bi-weekly class meetings.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, January 31, 2014.

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

The Importance of Sequencing in the Montessori Environment - With Snowman Printable!

namc montessori sequencing snowman printable

Being able to observe, recall, and sequence events is an important life skill. In sequencing, we learn about patterns in relationships and we learn to understand the order of things. By learning to sequence, we develop the ability to understand and arrange purposeful patterns of actions, behaviors, ideas, or thoughts. Included with this post explaining more about sequencing, is a set of "How To Build a Snowman" cards inspired by the chilly weather!

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Wednesday, January 29, 2014.

Friday, January 24, 2014

The Absorbent Mind: Chapter 1 - Studying the Works of Montessori

NAMC studying montessori the absorbent mind chapter 1 girl blowing dandelions

“But although education is recognized as one of the ways of raising mankind, it is nevertheless, still and only, thought of as an education of the mind.” – Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. 3.

As we begin our journey of discovery through reading Maria Montessori’s book The Absorbent Mind, we must, as Dr. Montessori did, examine the purpose of education. It is unfortunate that the idea of education today conjures up the idea of standardized curriculum and skill-based testing. Education is not a means to an end — to earn a degree and obtain employment. In fact, in recent years the concept of a “lifelong learner” serves to emphasize the idea that education is a process that evolves over time and not the idea that it ends with the procurement of a diploma.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, January 24, 2014.

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Developing Object Permanence Skills in the Montessori Infant/Toddler Environment

NAMC Montessori developing object permanence girl with box and ball

Have you ever played peekaboo with an infant or toddler? I love to hear that gurgle of laughter every time the person hiding appears. Why does this game appeal so much to young children? Adults know that when someone ducks out of view does, he has not disappeared forever, but for the young child, it truly is a case of “out of sight, out of mind.” When something is gone from sight, it no longer exists for the child.

Swiss psychologist Jean Piaget believed that the development of object permanence, or the ability to understand that objects exist even when not seen, is one of an infant’s primary developmental accomplishments.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Wednesday, January 22, 2014.

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Studying the Works of Dr. Montessori

“We know how to find pearls in the shells of oysters, gold in the mountains and coal in the bowels of the earth, but we are unaware of the spiritual germs, the creative nebulae, that the child hides in himself when he enters this world to renew mankind.” – Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, p. v.

NAMC studying Dr. Montessori's works portrait of Maria

New Year’s resolutions…do you keep them or do you break them? Making resolutions dates back to Roman times, when officials pledged to remain loyal to the republic on the first day of the year. The Roman god Janus, for whom January is named, was portrayed as having two heads – one looking forward to the future and one reflecting on the past.

The majority of resolutions today have to do with improving our health, relationships, or finances. When I thought about the past year and what I could have done better, I thought in terms of how to become a better Montessorian.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, January 14, 2014.

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

Formative and Summative Assessment in the Montessori Classroom

“Our care of the child should be governed, not by the desire to make him learn things, but by the endeavor always to keep burning within him that light which is called intelligence.”
— Maria Montessori, Spontaneous Activity in Education (p. 240).

NAMC montessori formative and summative assessments boy with crossed arms

There is a lot of talk these days about assessing student performance. Montessorians in the public sector are faced with standardized curriculum and mandated standardized testing, while those in the private sector face questions about how Montessori curriculum aligns to said standards. In addition, private Montessori schools face tough criticism on their philosophy regarding assessment and testing. In fact, a common argument against Montessori education is that there is no accountability due to lack of student assessment.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, January 7, 2014.

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Cultivating Motivation in the Montessori Environment

NAMC Montessori motivation in the environment boy with book

The Montessori environment is created to develop focus, stamina, and motivation to learn through the use of a well-prepared environment and developmentally appropriate materials. The desire to learn is intrinsically motivated by the environment and the gentle guidance of the Montessori teacher. But how do you keep the momentum of that motivation as children mature?

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, December 31, 2013.

Friday, December 20, 2013

The Order of Presentations in the Montessori Environment

Scientific observation then has established that education is not what the teacher gives; education is a natural process spontaneously carried out by the human individual, and is acquired not by listening to words but by experiences upon the environment.
― Maria Montessori, Education For A New World


NAMC montessori order of presentations boy writing


I recently had a NAMC student ask me for a pacing guide, or master plan of the order in which the Lower Elementary (LE) Montessori language lessons should be taught. While NAMC does provide a Mastery Checklist of all the LE language lessons and suggested age levels, we do not prescribe the exact order for the presentation of these lessons.

Since each child is different in both ability and experience, the best way to decide upon the order of teaching anything is to base it on diligent, scientific observations.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, December 20, 2013.

Tuesday, December 3, 2013

Using Letter Sounds in the Montessori Environment

When my son was around three years old, he suddenly became aware of words and their spelling. It seemed every time I turned around he was asking me how to spell something. “Momma, what spells Nathaniel? Momma, what spells Humphrey [our dog]? Momma what spells Grandma?” He didn’t ask me textbook words like dog or cat. He wanted to know real words he encountered in his everyday life.

namc montessori letter sounds phonetic spelling boy leaning

I realized, given the complexity of the words he was asking about, he didn't really want to know how to spell the whole word. What he wanted was the sounds!

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, December 3, 2013.
Find What Interests You Easily!

Are you interested in reading back through NAMC's blog articles from years gone by? Are you looking for more information on a specific topic?

Use the menu below to select the year and then the month to narrow down the time frame the articles you are interested in were posted. You can also browse our entire list of categories below; by clicking on one, you will see every article posted under that topic since 2007.

Still having trouble finding what you're looking for? Try our search box (located in the side bar of every page) to search all posts on our site for your keyword. If you require further information, or have comments or concerns, feel free to contact us.

NAMC Montessori Teacher Training Blog Archive

Post Category Labels

We'd love to hear from you!

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community.

NAMC is always looking for feedback and dialogue with our students and other Montessorians. We invite you to contact us if you may have any questions or comments in regards to our blog or articles we have posted here at our Montessori Teacher Training page.

Please note:If you want to learn more about NAMC, are interested in our programs, or are a student, please contact us through the main NAMC site to ensure a timely response from one of our advisors, tutors, or education specialists.

Fill out my online form.