Showing posts with label Benefits of Montessori Education. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Benefits of Montessori Education. Show all posts

Friday, March 7, 2014

Montessori Practical Life is More Than Chores

I recently came across a surprising article titled Why I Don’t Want My Kids Doing Chores – Even if They’re Age-appropriate. Curiosity got the better of me and I clicked on the link to read more.


In the article, Meredith Carroll states “I’d rather just do my kids’ chores for them… I don’t get … why I have to pain myself to teach them how to clean when what they’re doing is not actually cleaning, but usually making more of a mess, which is just work for me. It’s more work for me to nag them to tell them to do it.”

As a Montessorian, I was puzzled.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, March 7, 2014.

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

The Absorbent Mind, Chapter 2: Education for Life - Studying the Works of Montessori

NAMC studying the works of montessori absorbent mind education for life

“In states that make it a priority to educate our youngest children…studies show students grow up more likely to read and do math at grade level, graduate high school, hold a job, form more stable families of their own. We know this works. So let’s do what works and make sure none of our children start the race of life already behind.” ~ President Barack Obama, State of the Union, February 12, 2013.

This is the second installment of our series, Studying the Works of Montessori, focusing on Chapter 2 of the Absorbent Mind.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, February 4, 2014.

Tuesday, December 3, 2013

Using Letter Sounds in the Montessori Environment

When my son was around three years old, he suddenly became aware of words and their spelling. It seemed every time I turned around he was asking me how to spell something. “Momma, what spells Nathaniel? Momma, what spells Humphrey [our dog]? Momma what spells Grandma?” He didn’t ask me textbook words like dog or cat. He wanted to know real words he encountered in his everyday life.

namc montessori letter sounds phonetic spelling boy leaning

I realized, given the complexity of the words he was asking about, he didn't really want to know how to spell the whole word. What he wanted was the sounds!

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, December 3, 2013.

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Repetition in the Montessori Environment

NAMC repetition in the montessori environment girl knobbed cylinders

“Repetition is the secret of perfection” – Maria Montessori, The Discovery of the Child, p. 92

Remember the old adage, “practice makes perfect”? I am sure we can all agree on the importance of repetition in the Montessori environment. In fact, a recent search for “repetition” on the NAMC blog yielded the following results:

  • It is important to remember that the need for repetition is far more important than the need for mastery.
  • Repetition increases success.
  • Repetition of work will allow [the children] to practice, master, and retain the material.
  • Daily repetition will give much needed practice and reinforcement.
  • Some children are such careful observers while other children need more repetition and hands-on practice before they master a particular concept.
  • The student learns through repetition and memorization.
  • Through repetition of movement, improvement is made.
  • Through repetition, the Montessori child is able to differentiate between the slightest differences and variations in the world around him.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, September 24, 2013.

Friday, September 20, 2013

Montessori’s Three Levels of Obedience: Developing Self-Discipline

NAMC montessori three levels of obedience boy pouting

The ability to exercise control over one’s behavior amidst temptation is known as self-discipline. Dr. H. Stephen Glenn, of Developing Capable Young People, and Jane Nelsen, of Positive Discipline, both agree that children below the age of 7 or 8 are really incapable of self-discipline. (Glenn & Nelsen, 2000) In terms of Montessori, immediate gratification and lack of impulse control is a concrete behavior while self-discipline is more abstract. Young children are not capable developmentally to understand the consequences of giving into impulsive behavior. (Glenn & Nelsen, 2000)

This modern research clearly supports Dr. Montessori’s doctrine of the Three Levels of Obedience. “What we call the first level of obedience is that in which the child can obey, but not always. It is a period in which obedience and disobedience seem to be combined.” (Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, 1964)

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, September 20, 2013.

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Developing Citizens of the World: Teaching and Learning a Second Language in the Montessori Environment

NAMC montessori citizens of the world teaching learning second language

As Montessori teachers, we see daily evidence of the importance of language in early childhood development. We also observe how easily and avidly young children acquire language and build vocabulary. This inclination for language occurs because children are experiencing the sensitive period for language development from birth until about age six. From infancy, the need to communicate with others drives a child’s language progression from sounds to words to conversation. During the sensitive period for language, children are most interested in learning the names for everything around them. And as they expand their vocabulary, children are feeding their inclination to learn and develop.

While the young child is learning his native or primary language, he also has a great aptitude for learning to speak and understand a second or even third language at the same time.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, September 10, 2013.

Friday, September 6, 2013

Preparing the Montessori Environment for Children Who are Visually Impaired

“Our care of the child should be governed, not by the desire ‘to make him learn things,’ but by the endeavor always to keep burning within him that light which is called intelligence.” — Maria Montessori, The Advanced Montessori Method, p. 185.

NAMC preparing montessori environment for visually impaired children

This week NAMC received an email from a graduate who recently learned that one of her new students is a child who is blind. As this is a new situation for the teacher, she was feeling a bit anxious. Her main concern was how she could accommodate the child’s needs to the best of her ability in the Montessori 3–6 environment. Here are some thoughts for Montessori teachers who may have similar questions.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, September 6, 2013.

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Montessori Distance Learning Programs - Deciding if Training is Right for You

I first learned about Montessori education when I enrolled my son in our town’s Montessori program. What began as a decision made in desperation quickly turned into a passion for all things Montessori and I set about searching for a Montessori training center.

NAMC montessori distance learning programs is training right for you studying on laptop

I was disappointed to learn that the majority of Montessori training centers required me to attend in person for at least six weeks for two summers. I was a single mother and there was absolutely no way I could leave my 6-year-old son to obtain my certification.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, July 9, 2013.

Thursday, May 16, 2013

The Montessori Advantage: What is Redshirting?

NAMC montessori advantage what is redshirting children painting with teacher

My sister’s birthday falls on December 25th and she missed the cutoff date for kindergarten by just five days. My parents faced the dilemma of holding her back or putting her in a private kindergarten to keep up with her peers. Fast forward 32 years. My sister is now facing a similar dilemma herself as she decides whether my niece should spend a bonus year in preschool strengthening her social skills.

Holding kindergarten age children back a year is known as redshirting. Originally a term used in college sports, parents began redshirting their children to have the advantage of being the oldest and, therefore, smartest children in class. Statistics show that boys and affluent children are twice as likely held back as their peers. However, what do you do when nearly a quarter of the students in some kindergartens have been redshirted? (60 Minutes, 2012)

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Thursday, May 16, 2013.

Friday, March 15, 2013

Montessori's Sensitive Period for Order

NAMC Montessori's sensitive period for order boy with organized toys

About the time my son was two years old, I noticed an interesting trend when it came to cleaning his room each night. I would help him put his things away and he followed behind me making sure everything was exactly in its place. His trains had to be in a certain order on his train table, in a nice, neat line, and the rest of his toys, books, and even clothes had to be just so.

Montessori tells us that the sensitive period for order begins at birth, peaks during early toddlerhood, and generally lasts until around age five. Characterized by an inner need for consistency and repetition, the child in this sensitive period craves routines and predictability. Included in this is the child’s physical environment where everything has its place.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, March 15, 2013.

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Montessori for Our Family: Sharing a Love of Lifelong Learning Together

In celebration of Montessori Week, we are happy to share some thoughts about Montessori from members of our NAMC family.
NAMC celebrating montessori week with montessori for our family lifelong learning
Kathleen —

In recognition of Montessori Week, we asked our two high- school age boys what they considered memorable from their Montessori education. Without much hesitation they both said the math materials — in particular the Golden Bead Material and the Binomial and Trinomial Cubes. Concrete, hands-on materials for learning abstract concepts — wasn't Dr. Montessori a genius?

In reflecting on our reasons for pursuing a Montessori education for our children, especially beyond the preschool/kindergarten years, the Montessori hands-on materials were certainly a large factor. More so, and what we came to preach to our peers, was the physical movement that a Montessori classroom offered our boys. No long rows of desks to sit at all day, but rather options to work sitting at a table, standing at an easel, or lying on the floor with a mat.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Thursday, February 28, 2013.

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Montessori in Our Home: Living, Loving and Learning as a Montessori Family

In celebration of Montessori Week, we are happy to share some thoughts about Montessori from members of our NAMC family. 
NAMC celebrating montessori week with montessori in our home being a montessori family lisha and girls
 Lisha —

When I consider the impact Montessori has had on my life, I think about how my one and half year old daughter waits until her daddy has taken his last bite of an apple so she can throw it in the compost bin. How she gets spoons and bowls in the morning for her and her sister to eat breakfast. How she gathers everyone’s shoes at the front door so we can head out for the day, and how her older sister contemplated for 5 minutes whether to play or clean toilets before heading to bed. I think of all these daily occurrences, and I cannot help but smile and think how fortunate I was to understand and implement the Montessori method with my daughters from the day they were born.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Wednesday, February 27, 2013.

Friday, February 22, 2013

Celebrate Montessori Week! Sharing Experiences and the Importance of the Montessori Method

NAMC montessori week celebrate Maria Montessori historical classroom environment
The week of February 24–March 2 celebrates Montessori Week and marks the 106th anniversary of Montessori education. It is a time to come together as Montessorians to celebrate and recognize the amazing contributions of Dr. Maria Montessori in the lives of children around the world. Here are some of the most notable contributions that Dr. Montessori had on education and children's rights reform, as well as some inspiration for sharing your experiences with the Montessori community!

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, February 22, 2013.

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Dyscalculia and the Montessori Method

NAMC montessori method dyscalculia two students working together
Studies state that up to 7% of students are affected by dyscalculia
For many years, educators have been aware of children who have language difficulties or disorders. What many of us may not realize is that children may also have math disorders. In fact, the American Psychological Association classifies Dyscalculia as a math disorder in the DSM-IV (The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders). Recent research suggests that up to 7% of students are affected by severe learning disabilities in math (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 2012).

Dyscalculia goes beyond math anxiety. Children with Dyscalculia may have difficulties with calculation, understanding mathematical concepts, application with word problems, mathematical language, or even with number and symbol recognition.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Wednesday, January 30, 2013.

Thursday, December 20, 2012

Building Fraction Knowledge with Montessori Materials and Methods

NAMC is pleased to feature a guest blogger today. Laura Kane is a recent graduate of NAMC’s Lower Elementary Diploma Program. Laura was kind enough to share her thoughts on the benefits of Montessori materials and methods in building fraction knowledge. Welcome, Laura!

As my own memories of learning in a traditional classroom and my current discussions with parents of school-age children confirm, learning about fractions is one of the most confusing and frustrating learning experiences for traditionally educated elementary-age students (and their parents).
NAMC montessori materials methods fraction girl counting skittles dreidel
Laura’s daughter Abby (age 6) applies the fraction knowledge she has built with Montessori materials to her dreidel game. After winning half the pot, she is separating the candies into two piles to see how many she gets to keep
For instance, my daughter was playing dreidel over the weekend and had to figure out what "half" of the pot of 12 M&Ms was.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Thursday, December 20, 2012.

Friday, September 28, 2012

The Role of the Third Year Student in the Montessori Classroom

Role of Third Year Student NAMC Montessori Classroom planes of development girls work with blocks
In the Montessori classroom, third-year students apply
their knowledge and model behavior for younger students
When Maria Montessori developed her educational method, she created programs that encompass a three-year learning cycle. This three-year cycle corresponds with Montessori’s planes of development, each of which spans six years of the child’s life:
  • First plane: 0–6 years (Absorbent Mind)
  • Second plane: 6–12 years (Childhood)
  • Third plane: 12–18 years (Adolescence)
  • Fourth plane: 18–24 years (Young Adult)
Within each plane of development, there is a natural separation and transformation that occurs every three years.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, September 28, 2012.

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Bulletin Boards and Class Decor in the Montessori Environment

I admit it; I am hooked. Ever since my invitation to join Pinterest, it has become one of my favorite time wasters. Like any good thing, I have had to severely limit myself to small amounts of time and only after my work and homework are done!

NAMC montessori teacher helps girl with math materials montessori prepared environment class decor
The uncluttered, calming environment of the Montessori classroom helps students focus on the materials without distraction
Being a Montessori educator, I frequently find myself perusing the Education category. It is very easy to become tempted by the cute bulletin board and classroom décor ideas. There are welcome banners, posters, and so many colorful decorations it makes me feel like a kid in a candy store. Remember the looks on the children’s faces in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, when the children see the River of Chocolate and edible flowers and grass for the first time? They are totally overwhelmed. I can certainly relate, as I see all the classroom décor ideas and think, “I have to have it!” And then I realize, if my senses are overwhelmed, the children must be, too.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Wednesday, September 5, 2012.

Friday, April 13, 2012

STEM Educational Initiatives and The Montessori Method

STEM science technology engineering math montessori method succulent plant
Math and science work harmoniously in nature.
Since the launch of Sputnik in 1957, the US has called for an increase in scientific and mathematical education. There is currently a movement underway to train and terrain 100,000 STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) teachers. Across the country there are new standards for STEM subjects, with educators being charged to be creative and engaging rather than just teaching from a textbook.
 
What does this mean for Montessorians?

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, April 13, 2012.

Monday, January 30, 2012

A NAMC Student’s Experience as a Montessori Parent: Autism

Part 4 of 4 – Montessori For My Autistic Sons
boy working on montessori practical life activity folding autism autistic children montessori worksThe following four-part series includes excerpts from an introductory letter written by a NAMC Lower Elementary diploma program student, Rachel, to her NAMC tutor. A mother of six boys, she was first introduced to Montessori in seeking alternative method of education for her first son. Her first four sons attended public school since kindergarten, with the oldest three beginning their education in Montessori preschool. Rachel’s two youngest boys, aged nine and ten, are autistic and she has chosen to complete her NAMC 6-9 diploma so that she may work with her sons using the Montessori method.


Why do I think the Montessori method will work for my children with Autism?


As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Monday, January 30, 2012.

Friday, January 27, 2012

A NAMC Student’s Experience as a Montessori Parent: Choosing Teacher Training

montessori teacher and boy with flags choosing NAMC montessori teacher training autismPart 3 of 4 – Choosing NAMC Montessori Elementary Teacher Training

This four-part series include excerpts from an introductory letter written by a NAMC Lower Elementary diploma program student, Rachel, to her NAMC tutor. A mother of six boys, she was first introduced to Montessori in seeking alternative method of education for her first son. Her first four sons attended public school since kindergarten, with the oldest three beginning their education in Montessori preschool. Rachel’s two youngest boys, aged nine and ten, are autistic and she has chosen to complete her NAMC 6-9 diploma so that she may work with her sons using the Montessori method.

Why I chose the NAMC Montessori Lower Elementary diploma program to help my two youngest sons:


As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, January 27, 2012.
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As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community.

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