Monday, October 29, 2012

My Favorite Lower Elementary Montessori Material: The Montessori Checkerboard

NAMC montessori math favorite lower elementary material checkerboard boy doing big math
Doing big math with the Montessori Checkerboard
My lower elementary students know that the Montessori Checkerboard is my favorite lower elementary Montessori material. The Checkerboard is used for multiplication. It is a BIG work that leaves quite an impression on a young child.

Before using the Checkerboard, the child has been introduced to basic operations and hierarchical materials through the use of the Golden Bead Material, the Bead Cabinet, basic operation Finger Charts, Bead Frames and the Montessori Hierarchical Material. The Montessori Checkerboard reinforces those concepts with a new way of presenting the information, while at the same time allowing the child to increase his knowledge and skill level.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Monday, October 29, 2012.

Thursday, October 25, 2012

My Favorite Early Childhood Montessori Material - Preschool / Kindergarten: Golden Bead Material

Favorite NAMC Montessori Material Preschool Kindergarten math Golden Bead
The Golden Bead Material provides Montessori children with
a concrete understanding of the decimal system
When I first started to learn about Montessori and the materials, just the thought of the math materials made me anxious. But now, I can honestly say it is my favorite curriculum to teach the children. 

Favorite NAMC Montessori Material Preschool Kindergarten Golden Bead math teacher girl
Montessori children work with the Golden Bead Material to understand
the decimal system, to get a hands-on experience of quantity,
and to solve equations in the four operations
The hands-on Montessori materials make it easy to learn even the most difficult concepts, and learning the concrete before the abstract only makes sense.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Thursday, October 25, 2012.

Friday, October 19, 2012

A Montessori Approach to Parent Night: Tips For Community Building and Sharing Curriculum

NAMC montessori parent night guide teacher mother child
Montessori teachers are not used to standing up in front of a group and lecturing. Yet, often that is exactly what we find ourselves doing at back-to-school or parent night. But if we really wanted to give parents a taste of our Montessori environment, we would run our parent nights just as we do our classroom.

Build Community Through Modeling and Involvement

First, greet parents at the door just as you do your students. Shake their hand, look them in the eye, and tell them how happy you are that they could join you. This sets the mood for your evening and gives you an instant connection with your parents.

When your parents walk through the door, immediately involve them in getting to work, just as their children do when they come to school. Near the door, post an invitation to a specified work:

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, October 19, 2012.

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

A Montessori Teacher’s Account of Teaching During War - Syria

NAMC is privileged to have built a Montessori community of students that spans the globe. Many of our students are fortunate enough to live in countries that are politically stable, but many others have a different reality. They must find a way to live, work, study, and teach during a time of war. This is the current reality for Hanna, a NAMC student who lives and teaches in Syria. At our request, Hanna has kindly shared her personal experience of how the war in Syria is affecting the children in her school.
A NAMC Montessori Teacher’s Account of Teaching During War - Syria
Hanna and some of her students outside their Montessori school in Syria
I have tried in these first two weeks of the school year to study in depth the children of our kindergarten. I would like to clarify the fact that the children that attend our kindergarten belong to the middle class and above. They are not among those most affected by the war, which are mostly people belonging to the poor part of society. Our kindergarten is situated outside Damascus in a select area where the situation has been relatively calm until now; and I truly hope that it will continue to be so.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, October 9, 2012.

Friday, October 5, 2012

How Am I Montessori Away From My Classroom? Order and Relationships

NAMC montessori teacher helps girl montessori away from classroom order relationships

When I became Montessori certified, I thought I was making an important career change. What I didn’t realize was that it was also a lifestyle change. Being a Montessori teacher isn’t just about a natural, prepared classroom with shelves of Montessori materials. It’s a lifestyle that values respect and peace. It’s about doing unto others and seeing the world through the eyes of the innocent. It’s about order, calm, dignity, and freedom. When I walk out of my Montessori classroom, I carry all of that with me and it is part of who I am, in school and out.

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Friday, October 5, 2012.

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Project Based Learning in the Montessori Elementary Environment

girl makes island montessori project based classroom environment

I love the richness of the Montessori elementary cultural curriculum. There is something to be said about how the entire universe is presented to the child in the very beginning and then broken down in to manageable pieces. I also love how the Montessori method is not a prescribed curriculum in that it gives children the freedom to explore and learn that which interests them.

I have had many Montessori teachers ask me what kind of work I assign for follow-up work. In other words, how do my students practice new skills and knowledge and demonstrate mastery of content? As a Montessori teacher, I prescribe to the Constructionist theory of education. That is to say, I believe that in order for education to have meaning, it must be relevant and learner-centric. The learner must take the information that is presented and construct his/her own meaning and understanding.

Project based learning allows students to autonomously create artifacts that demonstrate mastery of concepts. Information is presented by the teacher in a lesson, but it is up to the learner to take the information and create something new. This requires some amazing higher-level thinking skills!

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community. © the North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Tuesday, October 2, 2012.
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As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community.

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